Equality?

While this post originally began its journey as one about humour, it soon changed my focus into one of equality. Hannah Gadsby‘s breakfast speech regarding who should have the right to define the “good …” caught my attention and I started digging around and found out that YouTube’s search engine prefers white comedians, in particular white male comedians. June Mills’ (Australian comedian) interview turned my mind completely away from comedy and humour.

Norway’s own history with regards to our minorities is terrible. I am not counting the new minorities (from 1970’s and on). Their lot is at least covered by law. Instead, I looked into the ones who have been here a long time. Our minorities consist of three groups of Sámi: the Sápmi, Sábme, and Saepmie. Along with the Sámi (40,000) we have (in no particular order) the Kven (about 10-60,000), Jews (1,000), Romani (10000), Forest Finns and Roma (5-600) people.

Since the information I found was incredibly plentiful I’ll have to write about them over, at least, the next three posts.

 

Leslé Honoré: We don’t report (2018)

We don’t report
Because you ask us what we wore
Were we drinking
Did we say no
We don’t report
Because husbands can’t rape
Because my mama would break
She would never forgive herself
For letting him in our home
And I want to protect my mama
The best way a 7 year old can
We don’t report
Because no one ever told me
What consent was
What my value is
That I can say no
We don’t report
Because long before my abuser
Groomed me
Society groomed me
Patriarchy groomed me
That I am worthless
I can’t even get paid equally
So I am not protected equally
When a man reports his priest
For raping him decades ago
He is heroic
When I report my rapist
To try and protect my nation
I am a whore
A liar
A con
A democratic plant
Because upstanding
Educated white men
Don’t rape
They don’t grab pussies
We don’t report
Because we know
You don’t care
And every time we
find the courage
That is deep within us
Past the shadows of our screams
Past the tattoos of hands that aren’t
Our own
Past the shame and pain
We push down
To try and love
Past the tears no one heard
Past the uncles at family BBQ’s that
We are supposed to forgive
Past the R Kelly’s songs on the radio
Woody Allen films
Or sacrificing my dignity
For what Cosby did for the culture
We push out our courage
Through all of the darkness
And hold it
Like a newborn in our hands
And then you murder it
Because we didn’t birth it sooner
And with the blood of our dead hope
Covering us
You scream in our faces
“WHY DIDN’T YOU REPORT”

~Leslé Honoré

 

Only two sexes? Hah

Propaganda is an odd phenomenon. In spite of the many lies we are told on a daily basis, we accept propaganda as true. Religion, states, science and cultures utilize propaganda in their socialization of individuals as productive members of society. Take biological sex. Many/most people are taught that there are only two sexes, male and female. Attempts to change status quo meets strong resistance. Introduction of third-gender options for birth-certificates, passports, bank papers or other legal documents exemplify how difficult necessary change is. Yet protestations do stop nature from diversifying sexual organs.

Consequences of political cowardice and voter attitudes are harsh for people who are born intersex. Horror stories regarding unsafe health personnel, their dissemination about long term effects and unnecessary operations of healthy children illustrate how dangerous propaganda is. Intersex individuals certainly do not support such assumptions.

While modern medical personnel perpetuate the myth of binary genders, they only spout what medical colleges and universities teach them. Teachers bring with them their own socialization which is based on whatever philosophical background they come from. The West, Middle-East, Asia and Africa all take part in abusing intersex children. Religion plays a large part in cultural philosophies and most religions speak only of male and female, with male as the standard against which all else is measured. Yet biology does not, in the least, care about propaganda people are socialized into.

Genitals start out looking the same. Not until the fetus is between 9 and 12 weeks is it possible to see which main direction their external and internal genitalia will take. From then on the phalloclitoris develops according to the hormonal output from our brains. The phalloclitoris is the soft organ that either stretches out into some kind of penis or it may split and grow internally to lie on either side of the vaginal canal. Nerve endings in the phalloclitoris render it highly sensitive to touch and is likely to produce pleasurable sensations. Removing parts of the phalloclitoris, because it does not fit with conventional opinions about biological sex, is sexual mutilation. Some children are born with a large external phalloclitoris complete with testicles plus a fully functioning uterus and ovaries (2011) Occasionally, teenagers begin menstruating through their penises. Others, like “Bob“, do not discover this reproductive combination until adulthood, and there are people who have lived with a combination of reproductive systems their entire lives without knowing. In the Dominican Republic there are people called guevedoces who begin life as girls and develop penises at puberty. Their status goes from female to male. In extremely rare instances a person may even have one side of their body develop along one line while the other side develops along the other.

The current system does not match reality and reality is what ought to be represented in bureaucracy’s obsession with labels, not an outdated patriarchal world-view that seems to think that an external and large phalloclitoris is the norm to which all else must bow. In Norway medical professionals claim it is unhealthy for the child to have unusual genitals, unlike New York which celebrates a birth certificate designating intersex as a gender. Germany allows genderless birth certificates and France has a neutral gender option on birth certificates. None have gone as far as Malta. In 2015 Malta chose to outlaw forced genital surgical intervention on minors, and I hope that the rest of the world soon joins them in ending this practice of genital mutilation. Only the person with the genitalia should decide what to do with their own bodies.

Menstruation/periods can be extra difficult with a disability

Finally, a frank conversation about disability and periods. My period arrived when I was about 12.5. It was an embarrassing day. Since then, I have wished it away. Slowly, that wish is coming true. During these 40 years of monthly bleeding, I have tried the traditional products (pads and tampons) but never alternative menstrual products (like menstrual cups/menskopp). I cannot use tampons and I would guess that I am not alone in that. Nor can I use silicone products and had no clue there were alternatives. Thankfully, crippledscholar has had experience with various menstrual products and brought the topic into the open. Like she says, there are considerations that people with disabilities have to think about that are irrelevant without disabilities. Maybe my last periods will be more comfortable than the previous ones have been.

Let’s Talk About Disability, Periods, and Alternative Menstrual Products
Posted by crippledscholar on July 8, 2016

There is so much I want to say about disability and menstruation. So much that I could never fit it into a single post. I have noticed that there is very little written about disability and menstruation generally and what little there is is most often not written by disabled people. As a result a lot of it is about control and often menstrual cessation in order to make the menstruating person more convenient for a care giver. This sometimes goes so far as sterilization of the disabled person.

The dearth of material on disability and menstruation from the disabled perspective likely has a number of influences that include the fact that menstruation is still unfortunately a taboo subject generally that people are embarrassed to talk about. Add to that the very idea of disability and sexuality is also still (somehow) widely denied. Which is, I suspect why so many nondisabled people feel so comfortable talking about period cessation as a reasonable solution to disabled people who have periods.

This focus on just stopping the whole business of menstruation is frustrating because it primarily marks the disabled body and its natural functions as too inconvenient. It also means that for those of us who do menstruate that we are left with disability specific information on how to deal with our periods.

It is the latter issue that I’m going to deal with now because the first issue while so important is just to big for me to handle right now.

I am going to talk about disability and the accessibility of alternative menstrual products.

Unfortunately, I am just one person with just one kind of disabled body and so nothing I say will have universal application. This is one of the reasons why we really need more disabled people to share their stories and experiences. If you have a different experience please share it in the comments or write your own blog post about it and share that in the comments.

Hopefully in spite of this I will have something useful to say or spark a conversation to get more voices heard because I really feel that it is essential to demystify and destigmatize not only menstruation and particularly disabled people menstruating.

For context (to see if what I say will translate well for you) I have left side hemiplegic cerebral palsy and am autistic. So most of what I have experience with is dealing with menstruation literally single handedly and the sensory aspects it entails.

I started menstruating when I was 11 and have primarily used pads as my go to feminine hygiene product. I found tampons difficult and uncomfortable for pretty much my entire childhood and teen years. I only started using them rarely when I was well into my twenties.

I have never found pads to be particularly comfortable and couldn’t manage to deal with anything other than the thinnest option. I’m still not a fan of tampons. I find the uncomfortable but sheer pragmatism has forced me to use them occasionally. I am always hyper aware of them the entire time that I do.

In the last decade or so alternatives to the standard and and tampon methods of dealing with menstruation have become more mainstream (though they have definitely existed longer than that).

Alternative period products are generally washable and reusable and are considered to be both more environmentally friendly and more cost effective.

The oldest alternative period product is probably the menstrual cup …………..

The rest of the article may be read at crippledscholar